The Disappearance of Lady Edith (The Undaunted Debutantes #1) by Christina McKnight

The Disappearance of Lady Edith (The Undaunted Debutantes #1) by Christina McKnight

One tragic night changed sensible, proper Lady Edith Pelton’s life: when her best friend fell to her death, pushed down a flight of stairs by a nefarious lord. Now, Edith dedicates her time watching the man she thinks is responsible, while gathering other information to expose other scoundrels posing as gentlemen of honour about London. But when her spying is noticed by a perfect stranger, Edith finds herself with two mysteries–what happened to her friend, and how to win the heart of a brilliantly handsome lord.

The Disappearance of Lady Edith (The Undaunted Debutantes #1) by Christina McKnight

I requested The Disappearance of Lady Edith to review largely because the cover caught my eye (we’ll ignore the truckload of makeup the woman is wearing in a time no respectable lady would wear any!).

While this is a highly readable book, there were so many little errors peppered throughout that it chipped away at my patience until I no longer enjoyed the story.

The mistakes range from the usual Americanisms, to facts about Regency England anyone writing in this genre should know.

For example:

  • You will find a marquess in the English peerage, but NOT a “marquis” (this book is not set in France!).
  • The hero’s name – Triston – is an American name, and certainly not something you’d expect to see in Britain’s 19th-century aristocracy.
  • It’s couldn’t care less. “Could” care less is incorrect in any version of the English language.

I simply lost patience with the book after a while. It doesn’t take long to check basic facts on Google.

It’s a pity, because the concept sounded interesting to me.

 

Review copy provided by NetGalley.

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One thought on “The Disappearance of Lady Edith (The Undaunted Debutantes #1) by Christina McKnight

  1. Pingback: The Week: 15th – 21st May – Sonya's Stuff

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