A Title to Make You Groan

`it's getting scot in here (wild wicked highlanders, #1) by suzanne enoch

Ignore He-Man for a moment and take a look at the title. Puns are (in my view!) unfortunately popular in historical romance – e.g. Earls Just Want to Have Fun and Cloudy With A Chance Of Marriage – but I think this one has to go on the shortlist for most cringeworthy!

It’s Getting Scot in Here, the first book in Suzanne Enoch’s Wild Wicked Highlanders series is due out on the 26th of this month.

It’s Getting Scot in Here (Wild Wicked Highlanders, #1) by Suzanne Enoch

Marry or lose their estate; that’s the devil’s bargain he and his brothers must follow. But wild Highlander Niall MacTaggert’s stubborn oldest brother wants nothing to do with marrying the sophisticated, pinky-out Lady Amelia-Rose his mother has chosen for him, even to save their land. Niall’s only goal is to soften up the London socialite, and show his brother the warm beauty behind the shiny, polished front. But what Niall doesn’t expect to find is the woman of his dreams…

Advertisements

Hands Off My HEA: Talia Hibbert

There’s a great article over at frolic that I read a little while ago. This is hardly a new topic for the romance genre, but Talia Hibbert takes on the book snobs in a refreshing way.

Hands Off My HEA: Talia Hibbert

When someone says “Romance doesn’t require a HEA!” I don’t hear: “Help me, I’m confused”. I hear: “I enjoy romance, but I don’t want to face the misogyny that romance-lovers face,” or: “I enjoy romance, but I struggle with internalised misogyny that says I shouldn’t.” To me, these people are trying to twist the meaning of ‘romance’ so our genre can fit alongside more respected forms of writing.

I don’t want the respect of anyone who can’t respect romance. Because they’re often misogynistic, usually ignorant, and frequently snobs. Their respect means nothing. Romance is above their respect. It’s about love, connection, caring, and hope. It’s about strength and power, about difference and kindness, and most of all, about everyone’s right to live happily ever after. It’s a trailblazing genre that constantly shakes the table. Anyone who tries to undermine that in a desperate grab for societal standing can go and debate their mother, because they certainly ain’t debating me.

Click on the link to continue reading…

Out Now: The Beast’s Heart by Leife Shallcross

The Beast's Heart by Leife Shallcross uS Cover

Released elsewhere in 2018, The Beast’s Heart by Leife Shallcross – a retelling of Beauty and the Beast – is out in the United States now.

The Beast’s Heart by Leife Shallcross

A luxuriously magical retelling of Beauty and the Beast set in seventeenth-century France–and told from the point of view of the Beast himself.

I am neither monster nor man—yet I am both.

I am the Beast.

He is a broken, wild thing, his heart’s nature exposed by his beastly form. Long ago cursed with a wretched existence, the Beast prowls the dusty hallways of his ruined château with only magical, unseen servants to keep him company—until a weary traveler disturbs his isolation.

Bewitched by the man’s dreams of his beautiful daughter, the Beast devises a plan to lure her to the château. There, Isabeau courageously exchanges her father’s life for her own and agrees to remain with the Beast for a year. But even as their time together weaves its own spell, the Beast finds winning Isabeau’s love is only the first impossible step in breaking free from the curse . . .

Out Soon: Lady Notorious by Theresa Romain

Lady Notorious, the fourth book in Theresa Romain‘s The Royal Rewards series, is due out later this month.

I think the cover design is really interesting (love the background!), however , no offence to the model, but WHY is she on ninety percent of historical romance covers these days?!

The book’s description is below the cover(s).

lady notorious (the royal rewards #4) by theresa romain

Fun fact: this was what the cover was supposed to look like, but it was too similar to another cover.

lady notorious by theresa romain original blue cover

Who knew love would be her secret weapon?

Cassandra Benton has always survived by her wits and wiles, even working for Bow Street alongside her twin brother. When injury takes him out of commission, Cass must support the family by taking on an intriguing new case: George, Lord Northbrook, believes someone is plotting to kill his father, the Duke of Ardmore. Decades before, the duke was one of ten who formed a wager that would grant a fortune to the last survivor. But someone can’t wait for nature to take its course—and George hopes a seasoned investigator like Cass can find out who.

Cass relishes the chance to spy on the ton, shrewdly disguised as handsome Lord Northbrook’s notorious “cousin.” What she doesn’t expect is her irresistible attraction to her dashing employer, and days of investigation soon turn to passionate nights. But with a killer closing in and her charade as a lady of the ton in danger of collapsing at any moment, Cass has no choice but to put her life—and her heart—in the hands of the last man she ought to trust.

 

Inheritance in the English aristocracy.

Following on from the issues I had with a recent historical romance, I’ve found that many others were pulled out of the same story by a glaring mistake. Basically: no, an English aristocrat can’t randomly lose his title. And so – no – you can’t write a book with the premise that the hero will lose the dukedom if he doesn’t marry by his thirtieth birthday.

There’re historical romance authors out there with a much more complex understanding of inheritance issues than I have, and one of those people is KJ Charles, who wrote an interesting blog post in response to the book’s release last week. (This isn’t the only book to run with this premise; just the most recent, and one that’s getting attention because it’s by a very popular author.)

Duchess by Deception (Gilded #1) by Marie Force

Read the whole piece HERE.

There are historical realities you can muck about with, tons of them. Have a zillion dukes by all means. Let them marry governesses and plucky flower girls, fine. These things are wildly implausible, but this is historical romance, and we’re here to play.

And then there are things that you cannot mess with, because they don’t play with the world, they break it. Chief amongst these in British aristocracy romance would be, er, destroying the entire system of British aristocracy. Which is what this plot does.

The point of a system of primogeniture—the whole, sole, single, solitary purpose of it—is to establish that nobility is bestowed by birth. The monarch can bestow a title on a commoner because of their merit on the battlefield/skill in the sack, but once it is granted, it operates under the rules. Nobody ever gets to decide who will inherit their title—not the monarch, nobody. It goes to the first in line: end of story. And once a peerage is bestowed it cannot be removed by anything less than an Act of Parliament or Royal prerogative. Certainly not by a previous holder’s whim.”

Coming Soon: Devil’s Daughter by Lisa Kleypas

Devil's Daughter (2019) (The fifth book in the Ravenels series) A novel by Lisa Kleypas UK Cover

Devil’s Daughter, the fifth book in Lisa Kleypas’ Ravenels series is out later this month. Here is the UK/Australian cover. I’d just like to point out that this book is set in the 1870s, and – lovely as they are – the clothes the woman is wearing are sixty years out-of-date!

However, I still prefer it to the US cover, which is some sort of bizarre prom queen extravaganza!:

Devil's Daughter (Ravenels #5) by Lisa Kleypas