The Week: 1st – 7th July

Tuggeranong Valley Brindabella Range Canberra Australia Sonya Heaney Mountains Nature 30th June 2019

The amazing Brindabellas that surround Canberra, at the end of last weekend.

The mountains are one of the inspirations for my book.

A crazy collection of noisy miner birds on Friday morning.

Busy week. I tried to get a lot of writing and editing done, but also this:

I swear, there is nothing more frustrating in this universe than trying to organise documentation and get through the red tape of a former (or current) communist country! The hoops you have to jump through are maddening, and I’ve done it twice in less than twelve months, first with communist China last year, and this week in preparation for two months (from August to October) in the former USSR. And it’s that difficult even with me knowing the staff at the embassy here in Canberra!

Why do I do this to myself? I’m not sure of the answer at the moment!

I got mansplained at by a twenty-one year old English guy this week. Not knowing I was Ukrainian, he spewed a whole lot of revolting Russian propaganda at me (what’s with the resurgence of under-thirty tankies?! It’s no better than being a Nazi.).

I was “informed” that Ukrainians want to be part of Russia (they don’t), that Ukrainians love Russians (they don’t – ethnic cleansing and genocide tend to sour people’s feelings). He also “informed” me that there’s nothing wrong with re-forming empires, and that England should be doing the same thing. I was further “informed” that Putin hasn’t done anything wrong (he has), that he wants good relations with the West (he doesn’t), and that it’s only the mean behavior of the EU that’s stopping Russia being good (uh, no).

What it all boils down to is that the whole world is capable of outrage about anything and everything that happens in the United States, but tens of thousands of dead Ukrainians don’t matter.

You know the term “seething with rage”? That’s what I was doing a few days ago.

Release Day for Mary Balogh

Someone to Honour Someone to Honor (Westcott #6) by Mary Balogh

Release Day for Anne Gracie

Marry in Secret (Marriage of Convenience #3) by Anne Gracie

Cover Love

My review of Bought Bride for the Argentinian by Sharon Kendrick

Bought Bride for the Argentinian by Sharon Kendrick

The Week: 27th May – 2nd June

I have a cover for my book! I can’t share it yet, but it’s FANTASTIC, and I keep randomly opening the file to look at it. I had to fill in a multi-page cover brief to give the designer an idea about what to do, and I was cautiously optimistic, but it is SO much better than I could have hoped for.

cof

The last day of autumn in Canberra.

So, now it’s winter in Australia. However, we’re still having such beautiful days.

The coming week is A BIG ONE for me. The Battle of Binh Ba 50th anniversary commemorations are going to take up all of my time (the 6th of June is the big day), so any plans to write/read/blog won’t happen. I know it’s the same date as the D-Day commemorations, but this battle was much more significant for the Australian military.

Binh Ba was one of Australia’s iconic battles in the Vietnam War, and my family is heavily involved in all aspects of the anniversary. (I know “iconic” is a bad choice of word, but I don’t know how else to describe it.) My father is one of the organisers of the whole thing – obviously, he fought in the battle – and I am going to have a chance to talk with the man who won a Military Cross for Binh Ba, a man whose book I am currently helping to write.

I am actually “moving into” a hotel here in Canberra for the duration of the events.

New Book for Joanna Shupe

Vintage Romance?

Recently Reread: Moon Called (Mercy Thompson #1) by Patricia Briggs

Notre Dame…

I’m sure everyone has seen the footage of Notre Dame in Paris on fire.

I have spent a lot of time in Paris – much of that time on my own. I used to walk to Notre Dame on many days, and simply sit in the cathedral for a while, occasionally attending a service, even though I’m not religious.

I thought it was terrible when far-right “activists” would go in there and shoot themselves at the altar to protest abortion or whatever. I thought that was as bad as it would get.

There was scaffolding on the part of the building that caught fire. Restoration work is so, so dangerous for historic buildings. Something very similar happened in Belfast when I was there last year.

A trip to the mothership… Jane Austen’s house

Love is the Best Medicine

Pretty much every romance reader and writer I’ve ever met has read at least one of Jane Austen’s books (or seen the movies/TV shows) and every one has their own opinion of them. I read most of them years ago and loved them (on the whole 😉 ), she had a sharp wit and a keen take on societal mores of the time.

I know little about her life, though, and am always interested in finding out people’s backstory (yeah, okay, I’m nosy!!), so on a recent flying visit to England I took a trip with my sister to the Jane Austen Museum in Chawton.  Jane lived there from 1809 to 1817, just before she died at the young age of 41 of an unspecified illness (although researchers in the 1960s think it may have been a form of lymphoma). She wrote Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Northanger Abbey…

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The Cottingley Fairies by Ana Sender

In Times Gone By...

The Cottingley Fairies by Ana Sender

Fairies exist and these girls have proof!

Elsie and Frances feel sad for adults who simply can’t see the magic in the forests around them. If only they could see what we see. Taking photos is like opening windows . . .

And that’s just what they did.

In 1918, Elsie Wright and her cousin Frances Griffith photographed fairies in their garden, in the small village of Cottingley (Yorkshire). Without expecting it, many people paid attention—including renowned writer and spiritualist Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Although initially reluctant, the famous author convinced a large part of public opinion.

This is the story, narrated by Elsie herself, of the true events.

The Cottingley Fairies by Ana Sender

In the 1910s, two cousins in West Yorkshire, England became famous after releasing photographs of what they claimed to be real fairies. Many people were tricked into believing the girls, including – infamously – Sir…

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The Problem With Amazon Is…

The Cheeky Wench

There are a lot of problems facing the indie publishing industry right now. Each vendor—Amazon, Nook, iTunes, Kobo, and Google Play—has their own unique problems. But those problems pale in comparison to the problems plaguing Amazon. 

You might want to grab a cup of coffee and settle in. This could take a while.

Pick any day of the week and invariably someone is posting a question to a board or a group that begins with “Is anyone else having issues at Amazon involving[insert problem here]?”Someone will usually reply with “Yes, I’m having same issue. When I called, they said there was a ‘glitch’ in the system.”

For a multi billion dollar corporation, they certainly seem to have a lot of ‘glitches’. I don’t mean one or two glitches spread across the timespan of a year. I’m talking near daily ‘glitches’. Issues ranging from files not uploading, can’t…

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