Recently Reread: Cry Wolf (Alpha and Omega #1) by Patricia Briggs

My attempts to get back into urban fantasy and paranormal romance this year have so far been to reread old favourites.

Patricia Briggs is amazing. Her Mercy Thompson series is a little more in the urban fantasy realm, and Alpha and Omega is a little more paranormal romance (but the romance is still subtle).

These are still my favourite werewolf books; Briggs knows her world inside-out.

Despite the listing, I thinking nobody – NOBODY – should read this one without reading the introductory novella first, where main characters Charles and Anna meet and become mates.

I have a slight problem with the “nasty blonde” secondary character, but Briggs also gives her some complexity, so she gets away with my #1 pet hate – just.

If I’m going to be reintroduced to all things paranormal, this is a good way to start.

Cry Wolf by Patricia Briggs

Cry Wolf (Alpha and Omega #1) by Patricia Briggs

Anna never knew werewolves existed, until the night she survived a violent attack… and became one herself. After three years at the bottom of the pack, she’d learned to keep her head down and never, ever trust dominant males. Then Charles Cornick, the enforcer—and son—of the leader of the North American werewolves, came into her life.

Charles insists that not only is Anna his mate, but she is also a rare and valued Omega wolf. And it is Anna’s inner strength and calming presence that will prove invaluable as she and Charles go on the hunt in search of a rogue werewolf—a creature bound in magic so dark that it could threaten all of the pack.

It is recommended you read the prequel “Alpha & Omega” before reading Cry Wolf.

Book Feature: Lies Jane Austen Told Me by Julie Wright

Note: I am featuring some of the review books I’ve had for a while, but run out of time to do a review for. That’s not to say I’m not going to read them; it’s just that I’ve fallen behind, and think the authors deserve an appearance here!

Lies Jane Austen Told Me by Julie Wright

Lies Jane Austen Told Me by Julie Wright

Ever since Emma read Pride and Prejudice, she’s been in love with Mr Darcy and has regarded Jane Austen as the expert on all things romantic. So naturally when Emma falls for Blake Hampton and he invites her home to meet his parents, she is positive an engagement is in her future. After all, Blake is a single man in possession of a good fortune, and thus must be in want of a wife.

But when it turns out that what Blake actually wants is more of a hook-up than a honeymoon, Emma is hurt, betrayed, and furious. She throws herself deeper into her work as CMO of Kinetics, the fastest growing gym franchise in the nation. She loves her work, and she’s good at it, which is why she bristles when her boss brings in a consultant to help her spearhead the new facilities on the East Coast. Her frustration turns to shock when that consultant turns out to be Blake’s younger brother, Lucas.

Emma is determined not to fall for Lucas, but as she gets to know him, she realises that Lucas is nothing like his brother. He is kind and attentive and spends his time and money caring for the less fortunate.

What she can’t understand is why Lucas continues to try to push her back into Blake’s arms when he so clearly has fallen as hard for her as she has fallen for him. It isn’t until Lucas reveals to Emma that he was adopted into the Hampton family that she begins to understand his loyalty to Blake as well as his devotion to the child April-she is Lucas’s biological niece.

Emma opens up to Lucas about the feelings of abandonment she has harboured ever since she was a child and her mother left the family. As she helps Lucas deal with his past demons, she is able to exorcise some of her own.

Realising that her love life is as complicated as anything Jane Austen could have dreamed up, Emma must find a way to let Blake know that it’s time for him to let her go and to let Lucas know it’s time for him to love her back.

 

The Week: 3rd – 9th June

Here are a couple of images from the day-long 50th anniversary commemorations for the Battle of Binh Ba in Canberra on Thursday, which were broadcast live on TV. (If you’re an avid war history fan, you can still watch the whole thing online!)

The first one shows the Minister for Veterans and Defence on the left, and Vietnam veterans from the official party on the right. My father is the veteran in the centre. It was SO sunny that we were all blinded and melting by the end, despite it being the first week of winter!

Battle of Binh Ba 50th Anniversary Anzac Parade, Canberra, Australia 6th June 2019 Ray De Vere Chris Heaney Vietnam Veterans Vietnam War

The second image is from the Last Post ceremony at the Australian War Memorial the same evening. The ceremony was dedicated to Binh Ba veterans in general, and to the sole Australian killed in the fighting in particular. (There was also a British D-Day veteran present.) Afterwards, veterans and their families were lined up for a photograph – I’m one of the dots on the left of the picture!

Veterans and the families of those who served. Battle of Binh Ba, Vietnam, 50th anniversary. Last Post Ceremony #awmemorial cbr.

We had a formal dinner that night. You don’t know what it’s like to party until you’ve done it with Vietnam veterans! We overstayed our welcome in the ballroom, were moved up to the rooftop bar – and then overstayed our welcome there!

My Cover!

The Landowner's Secret by Sonya Heaney blog-sized

My review of Resurgent by Brynley Blake

Resurgent by Brynley Blake

My Cover!

I now have a high-resolution, un-watermarked cover for my upcoming book to show you. I love it, and I think it really represents the story.

Here’s what my book is about:

New South Wales, 1885

When Alice Ryan wakes to find thugs surrounding her cottage, on the hunt for her no-good brother, she escapes into the surrounding bush.

It is wealthy landowner Robert Farrer who finds her the next morning, dishevelled, injured, and utterly unwilling to share what she knows. With criminals on the loose and rumours that reckless bushrangers have returned to the area, Robert is determined to keep Alice out of danger, and insists on taking her into his home-despite the scandal it may cause. Convincing her to stay on with him for her own safety, however, is going to take some work.

What Robert doesn’t expect is his growing attraction to the forthright, unruly woman staying in his home. Before either of them can settle into their odd new situation, their home and wellbeing come under threat and they will need to trust each other to survive. But they are both keeping secrets, secrets that have the potential to ruin their burgeoning love, their livelihood … and their lives.

Here are some preorder links:

HarperCollins AU US

Amazon AU US UK

Romance.com.au

Kobo AU NZ US UK CA IE IN ZA

Barnes and Noble

Apple Books

Google Play

Booktopia

And here it is!

The Landowner's Secret by Sonya Heaney

Hey – Australians!

Batlle of Binh Ba Vietnam War 50th Anniversary Canberra Australia 5th June 2019

Everyone in Australia: at 2pm tomorrow the 50th anniversary commemorations for the Battle of Binh Ba – a major battle in the Vietnam War – are going to be broadcast live on television from Canberra, and then repeated the day after.

My father has played a huge part in organising this event, and hundreds of soldiers, past and present, are flying in to participate. My parents are in the official party, and will be obvious on TV, and I’ll be sitting… somewhere…! We’ve all been too busy to finalise this.

Afterwards, there’s a function at the Australian War Memorial, and then there’s a huge dinner tomorrow night, and I’ll be staying at the hotel in the city, because there’s just so much going on!

Resurgent by Brynley Blake

Resurgent by Brynley Blake

Never Underestimate the Power of F*ck It

It’s the motto I live by, and it’s what made me the Navy SEAL I am today. I’ve learned the less you care, the better. But when I wake up in a hospital in India with no memory of the last few months, I’m at a loss. Everything points to me being involved with some dangerous people.

People who kidnapped my little sister’s best friend Charlotte—who’s haunted my dreams, and now is making my reality a living hell.

I can’t remember what I’ve supposedly done, or who’s trying to kill us. All I know is that I have to find Charlotte and get us both out of this mess alive.

Only I hadn’t counted on Charlotte having her own agenda…

Resurgent by Brynley Blake

This is a quick read that’s part of a series, but the author promises can be read as a standalone. However, I’ve seen other reviewers mention a person will get much more out of the story by reading them in order (this is book three).

One thing that won’t appeal to all readers of adult (as in, not YA or NA) romances: Resurgent is written in the first person.

Is amnesia making a comeback as a theme? This book uses the trope, and it’s the first one I’ve come across in years that does. However, I have seen at least one editor recently requesting amnesia manuscripts. Everything old is new again…

Because of its length, this is a fast-paced book (appreciated in the romantic suspense genre), and I do think because of that, reading in order is preferable so that you know the characters better.

The series seems to have a devoted following, but I must admit I prefer books about the over-twenty-fives to be written in third person.

 

Review copy provided by NetGalley.

The Week: 27th May – 2nd June

I have a cover for my book! I can’t share it yet, but it’s FANTASTIC, and I keep randomly opening the file to look at it. I had to fill in a multi-page cover brief to give the designer an idea about what to do, and I was cautiously optimistic, but it is SO much better than I could have hoped for.

cof

The last day of autumn in Canberra.

So, now it’s winter in Australia. However, we’re still having such beautiful days.

The coming week is A BIG ONE for me. The Battle of Binh Ba 50th anniversary commemorations are going to take up all of my time (the 6th of June is the big day), so any plans to write/read/blog won’t happen. I know it’s the same date as the D-Day commemorations, but this battle was much more significant for the Australian military.

Binh Ba was one of Australia’s iconic battles in the Vietnam War, and my family is heavily involved in all aspects of the anniversary. (I know “iconic” is a bad choice of word, but I don’t know how else to describe it.) My father is one of the organisers of the whole thing – obviously, he fought in the battle – and I am going to have a chance to talk with the man who won a Military Cross for Binh Ba, a man whose book I am currently helping to write.

I am actually “moving into” a hotel here in Canberra for the duration of the events.

New Book for Joanna Shupe

Vintage Romance?

Recently Reread: Moon Called (Mercy Thompson #1) by Patricia Briggs

Recently Reread: Moon Called (Mercy Thompson #1) by Patricia Briggs

Moon Called (Mercy Thompson #1) by Patricia Briggs

Patricia Briggs is an author who can draw me back to the paranormal subgenres in a way most others can’t. It has been years since I went near a Mercy Thompson book, and I remembered just enough for this first instalment in the series for it to feel both like an old friend and a new adventure.

The Mercy series is urban fantasy, with a relationship that develops in the background as the series goes on. It’s told in the first person, which I don’t usually love in adult fiction, but really enjoy here.

Mercy is a coyote shapeshifter who was raised by werewolves, but is never quite included in their society. She lives a working-class existence as a mechanic (but running her own garage), and she lives in a trailer that overlooks a mansion. The mansion is owned by the city’s Alpha werewolf, Adam Hauptman.

What’s so solid about this series is that Briggs knows her world inside-out. It’s fantastical, but also believable, and all of her characters are very distinctive. There are a few sad parts in this book, but it’s not a downer.

One thing urban fantasy has going for it over paranormal romance is how many risks an author can take without upsetting their readership.

We meet quite a lot of characters in quick succession in this book, and there is plenty of world building to be done, so in some ways Moon Called suffers from “first book syndrome”. However, Briggs has a very engaging writing style, and is really great at creating fascinating situations in the complex supernatural world most (but not all) of the characters inhabit – in an otherwise typical suburban American existence.

My only issue with this series (and Briggs’ writing in general) is that it – like the work of so many others writing with paranormal themes – has some really misogynistic themes. It’s a curse of all paranormal subgenres: authors seem to insist on making their heroines “special” by making the other women awful. All the women in this series – bar Adam’s teenaged daughter – hate Mercy. It’s too much.

Urban fantasy is not usually my thing, but Patricia Briggs made it my thing years ago. I’m happy to say I enjoy the books just as much now.

Moon Called (Mercy Thompson #1) by Patricia Briggs

Mercedes Thompson, aka Mercy, is a talented Volkswagen mechanic living in the Tri-Cities area of Washington. She also happens to be a walker, a magical being with the power to shift into a coyote at will. Mercy’s next-door neighbour is a werewolf. Her former boss is a gremlin. And she’s fixing a bus for a vampire. This is the world of Mercy Thompson, one that looks a lot like ours but is populated by those things that go bump in the night. And Mercy’s connection to those things is about to get her into some serious hot water…

Vintage Romance?

I don’t want to talk about old-school romance books right now, but romances that are too modern to be classed as historical romance, and too old-fashioned to be classed as contemporary romance.

This has been on my mind a bit recently for a few reasons:

  • In an authors’ group I’m part of I came across several people who wanted to submit manuscripts set in the 1960s and the 1970s and the 1980s, but they had no idea who would even look at them.
  • I am currently working on my father’s Vietnam War commander’s memoirs (my father was in the armoured corps of the Australian Army), and I have the 60s on my mind.
  • June this year sees the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Binh Ba – considered the second most significant battle Australia fought in Vietnam – and my father is helping to organise the entire national service/memorial (he also did the 40th).

There is so much potential for so many good stories set in the second half of the 20th century. It was a time with so much upheaval. The Cold War, the rise and fall of communism, Korea, Vietnam… Not to mention all the changes at home, with women’s changing roles in society etc.

And yet… where are these books?

I do know of one publisher who has actively been seeking these sorts of stories for years and years: The Wild Rose Press.

However, isn’t it time we start a wider market for these books?

New Book for Joanna Shupe

Joanna Shupe’s The Rogue of Fifth Avenue, the first in a new series, is out now.

The Rogue of Fifth Avenue (2019) (The first book in the Uptown Girls series #1) A novel by Joanna Shupe

The Rogue of Fifth Avenue (Uptown Girls series #1) by Joanna Shupe

He can solve any problem . . .

In serving the wealthy power brokers of New York society, Frank Tripp has finally gained the respectability and security his own upbringing lacked. There’s no issue he cannot fix . . . except for one: the beautiful and reckless daughter of an important client who doesn’t seem to understand the word danger.

She’s not looking for a hero . . .

Excitement lies just below Forty-Second Street and Mamie Greene is determined to explore all of it – while playing a modern-day Robin Hood along the way. What she doesn’t need is her father’s lawyer dogging her every step and threatening her efforts to help struggling families in the tenements.

However, she doesn’t count on Frank’s persistence . . . or the sparks that fly between them. When fate upends all her plans, Mamie must decide if she’s willing to risk it all on a rogue . . .