Recently Reread: Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen’s most famous novel, Pride and Prejudice, was published on the 28th of January 1813. Here is the front page from a first edition copy of the book.

I reread Pride and Prejudice (and Persuasion) every so often, because why not?!

Unlike many people, who seem to have studied Jane Austen and the Brontë sisters at school or university, I never did. Even though I majored in English in college (the finally two years of high school) and in literature at university, I’ve had to discover some of these classics on my own.

I think I develop a greater appreciation for Austen every time I read her work. However, one thing I noticed in this reread is that Elizabeth Bennet considers herself an “I’m not like other women!” lady. She actually makes several statements to that effect, including directly to Mr Darcy near the end. Funny, that in 2019 we still can’t get authors to stop writing characters who think like that!

Anyway, other than that little discovery, I still liked it. 🙂

Jane Austen Things

I’m not the biggest fan of Pride and Prejudice 2005, and it infuriates me that people think Chatsworth House is meant to be Pemberley (Mr Darcy’s home – and it isn’t!).

However, the visit to Chatsworth today was pretty entertaining from a Jane Austen perspective.

Proper pictures later, but for now, here’s Mr Darcy’s bust from the movie, plonked in the middle of the souvenir shop. You can buy your own miniature version for £50 (I managed to restrain myself 😁). (Please excuse the colour differences. I didn’t edit the pictures, but they were taken on two different phones!)

The sign underneath it asks people to please not *kiss* it!

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And here is the signed copy of Longbourn I bought. I already own it in ebook form, love it, and reviewed it HERE.

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Jane Austen (Little People, Big Dreams) by Isabel Sanchez Vegara

Jane Austen (Little People, Big Dreams) by Isabel Sanchez Vegara

New in the Little People, Big Dreams series, discover the remarkable life of Jane Austen, the British novelist, in this true story of her life. Little Jane grew up in a big family that loved learning and she often read from her father’s library. In her teenage years she began to write in bound notebooks and craft her own novels. As an adult, Jane secretly created stories that shone a light on the British upper classes and provided a witty social commentary of the time, creating a new dialogue for female characters in books. With stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, this empowering series celebrates the important life stories of wonderful women of the world. From designers and artists to scientists, all of them went on to achieve incredible things, yet all of them began life as a little child with a dream. These books make the lives of these role models accessible for children, providing a powerful message to inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world!

Jane Austen (Little People, Big Dreams) by Isabel Sanchez Vegara

Jane Austen is part of a series aimed at very young readers, introducing children to famous women in history.

The illustrations are simple, and a little childlike, as though young Jane herself might be telling the story.

Austen’s works are far too advanced for readers in the target age group of this book, but it’s an interesting way to introduce girls and boys alike to the fact there were PLENTY of women in history who achievement many different things.

 

Review copy from NetGalley.