Time School by Nikki Young

Time School by Nikki Young

A power cut and a series of mini disasters means friends, Jess, Nadia, Tomma and Ash barely make it to the station to catch their train to school. What they find is a far cry from the usual packed commuter train they’re expecting…

When they arrive at Hickley School, the children are surprised to find some of the buildings missing and they don’t recognise any of the other pupils, who are all dressed in a different style of uniform. The only person who takes the time to help them is Martha, despite being preoccupied by her own worries about her family being hungry and not hearing from brother, Henry whom she says is away fighting.

The children soon realise this is no normal day and it’s not until they return home that they’re able to figure out what happened. What they don’t know is whether it was a one-off day, or if they will get to see Martha and the other pupils again. Jess hopes so. She has something she needs to tell Martha. Not knowing how or why, she feels a connection and an obligation to this girl she can’t explain.

Time School by Nikki Young

I’ve been liking seeing the First World War-themed books for younger readers that have been appearing in recent months. At the centenary of the of the end of the war, it’s a good way to engage another generation with one of the most significant events in human history.

As with other books I’ve seen with similar themes, Time School does a good job of connecting modern-day children with the past by introducing us to characters both past and present, characters who find a direct connection over time. We learn through the characters’ eyes how life was, and how things have changed.

Recommended both for the target age group and anyone else who enjoys a creative children’s book.

 

Review copy provided by NetGalley.

On this day: human rights in Canada

Ukrainians in Castle Mountain concentration camp in 1915.

The 22nd of August, 1914 saw the passing of Canada’s War Measures Act. The act would result in government-sanctioned human rights abuses against Canadians of largely Ukrainian origin.

Ukrainians were declared “enemy aliens” and thousands were put into concentration camps to be used for slave labour across Canada. They were seen as enemies because the western regions of their homeland were under Austro-Hungarian rule at the outbreak of the First World War.

Some 80 000 Ukrainians who weren’t imprisoned were still required to register as enemy aliens and barred from leaving the country.

Plaque and statue at Castle Mountain near Banff.

The infamous Castle Mountain Internment Camp in Alberta saw prisoners used to work in the national parks, where they established the groundwork for the massive tourism to Banff and Lake Louise seen today.

Abuses at the camp were widespread, and were reported as far away as Britain.

Internment continued for two years after the war ended.

Kapuskasing_ON_3The Ukrainian cemetery at the Kapuskasing Internment Camp a concentration camp for mostly ethnic Ukrainians imprisoned to be used for slave labour during the First Wor

Ukrainian cemetery at the Kapuskasing Internment Camp in Ontario.

The internment of ethnic groups was widespread across many countries in both the First and Second World Wars, including in Australia and the United States, though the internment of Japanese Americans in the 1940s is generally the only instance most know of.

On this day: the Battle of Amiens

In Times Gone By...

The iconic Battle of Amiens, later to be known as the opening chapter of the Hundred Days Offensive that ended the First World War, took place from the 8th to the 12th of August, 1918.

This painting, by Australian official war artist Will Longstaff, is titled 8th August, 1918. It shows a column of German prisoners of war heading in one direction, while horse-drawn artillery heads in the other.

The painting can be found in the collection of the Australian War Memorial in Canberra.

8th August, 1918 (oil-on-linen, 107 cm x 274 cm, 1918-1919) by Will Longstaff, Australian official war artist. Depicts a scene during the Battle of Amiens. The view is towards the west,

View original post

100 Years Ago

allenby_enters_jerusalem_1917general-sir-edmund-allenby-entering-the-holy-city-of-jerusalem-on-foot-1917-to-show-respect-for-the-holy-place-first-world-war-one

Following the surrender of the Ottoman Empire two days earlier, Britain’s General Sir Edmund Allenby entered Jerusalem on the 11th of December, 1917.

Described as a Christmas present to the British people, this event saw the city come under Christian rule for the first time in centuries.

Allenby entered the city on foot as a sign of respect to the holy place.

The Turkish surrender came during the Battle of Jerusalem that began in mid-November.

100 Years Ago

ottoman_surrender_of_jerusalem_restored-ottoman-empire-pows-of-world-war-i-in-jerusalem-ottoman-palestine-1917-mayor-of-jerusalem-hussein-effendi-el-husseini-al-husseini-meeting-

The Ottoman Empire surrendered Jerusalem to British rule on the 9th of December, 1917.

The surrender came during the Battle of Jerusalem, which was fought from the 17th of November. The battle saw the combined forces of Britain, Australia, India and New Zealand defeat the Ottoman (Turkish) and German Empires.

The image shows the Ottoman mayor of Jerusalem and Ottoman prisoners of war meeting British representatives under the white flag of surrender.

Australian War Memorial Canberra

(I’m copying this from my other blog, because I read and review a lot of military-themed books. Check out the Australian Special Forces uniforms!)

We had a public holiday yesterday. I think it used to be the Melbourne Cup holiday, but the ACT Government moved it and renamed it. Whatever it is, it’s just an excuse to not go to work!

I went with my parents to the Australian War Memorial here in Canberra, which – despite being called a “memorial” – is actually a huge war museum to rival those anywhere else in the world.

The first picture is of some of the Victoria Cross soldiers’ uniforms. The one on the left belongs to giant SAS Special Forces soldier Ben Roberts-Smith (or HERE). I had to get a blurry photo just because it’s so huge (he is nearly 6’7″, which is massive for a Special Forces soldier)!

It was SO crowded yesterday, with a gazillion tour bus-loads of visitors. It’s interesting watching people who have never been there before. There were actually people who were walking around crying, that’s how moved they were.

My father is a war veteran, so we occasionally drop by and just look at a couple of things (usually things involving the Vietnam War) and then go for a glass of wine! It’s free, so it’s easy to do. However, this is the first time I’ve been where they had a teeny bit of security at the entrance.

The main reason we went is because Mephisto, a World War One tank, is on loan to the museum at the moment, and we hadn’t seen it before.

What’s really upsetting is that at the entrance there’s a boat from the Gallipoli landings, and every time we go there, everyone is running their hands all over it, despite being told not to. It’s astonishing how disrespectful people can be to such important historical pieces.

victoria-cross-winners-uniforms-australian-war-memorial-canberra-26th-septermber-2016-sonya-oksana-heaney-military-sas

australian-war-memorial-canberra-26th-septermber-2016-sonya-oksana-heaney-military-outside

australian-war-memorial-canberra-26th-septermber-2016-sonya-oksana-heaney-military-mephisto-1-tank

australian-war-memorial-canberra-26th-septermber-2016-sonya-oksana-heaney-military-tank-mephisto-2